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QUINCY JONES

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BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS

Full Name: Quincy Delight Jones, Jr.

Description: Trumpeter,Composer, Conductor, USA
Known For: In 1964 Jones, at the invitation of film director Sidney Lumet, began composing one of the first of the 33 major motion picture scores he would eventually write. The result was the score for The Pawnbroker.

Instruments: Trumpet, drums, vocals,
Music Styles: Pop, funk, soul, big band, swing, jazz, traditional pop, bossa nova, hip-hop

Location: United States of America

Date Born: 14th March 1943
Location Born: Louisville, Kentucky, United States of America

CONTACT DETAILS

Web Site: http://www.quincyjones.com

Other Links: For other links about this entertainer click on the Links button above

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BIOGRAPHICAL PROFILE

QUINCY JONES

An American music conductor, record producer, musical arranger, film composer, television producer, and trumpeter.

Quincy Delight Jones, Jr. (born March 14, 1933) is an American record producer, conductor, arranger, composer, musician, television producer, film producer, instrumentalist, magazine founder, entertainment company executive, and humanitarian. His career spans six decades in the entertainment industry and a record 79 Grammy Award nominations, 27 Grammys, including a Grammy Legend Award in 1991.

Jones came to prominence in the 1950s as a jazz arranger and conductor, before moving on to work prolifically in pop music and film scores.

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In 1968, Jones and his songwriting partner Bob Russell became the first African Americans to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song, their “The Eyes of Love” for the Universal Pictures film Banning. That same year, Jones was the first African American to be nominated twice within the same year for an Academy Award for Best Original Score, as he was also nominated for his work on the film In Cold Blood (1967). In 1971, Jones was the first African American to be named as the musical director and conductor of the Academy Awards ceremony. In 1995 he was the first African American to receive the Academy’s Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award. He is tied with sound designer Willie D. Burton as the African American who has been nominated for the most Oscars; each has received seven nominations.

Jones was the producer, with Michael Jackson, of Jackson’s albums Off the Wall (1979), Thriller (1982), and Bad (1987), as well as being the producer and conductor of the 1985 charity song “We Are the World”.

In 2013 Jones was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as the winner, alongside Lou Adler, of the Ahmet Ertegun Award. Among his awards, Jones was named by Time Magazine as one of the most influential jazz musicians of the 20th century.

During five decades in the entertainment industry, Jones has earned a record 79 Grammy Award nominations, 27 Grammys, including a Grammy Legend Award in 1991.

He is best known as the producer of the album Thriller, by pop icon Michael Jackson, which has sold over 110 million copies worldwide, and as the producer and conductor of the charity song “We Are the World”.

In 1968, Jones and his songwriting partner Bob Russell became the first African-Americans to be nominated for an Academy Award in the “Best Original Song” category.

That same year, he became the first African-American to be nominated twice within the same year when he was nominated for “Best Original Score” for his work on the music of the 1967 film In Cold Blood.

In 1971 Jones would receive the honor of becoming the first African American to be named musical director/conductor of the Academy Awards ceremony.

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He was the first African-American to win the Academy’s Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, in 1995.

He is tied with sound designer Willie D. Burton as the most Oscar-nominated African American, each of them having seven nominations.

At the 2008 BET Awards, Quincy Jones was presented with the Humanitarian Award. He was played by Larenz Tate in the 2004 biopic about Ray Charles, Ray. In 1963 Jones helped discover singer Lesley Gore, and produced some of her biggest hits, including “It’s My Party”.

In the 1960s, Jones worked as an arranger for some of the most important artists of the era, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee, and Dinah Washington. While working on the film The Wiz, Michael Jackson asked Quincy to recommend some producers for his upcoming solo record.

Work with Frank Sinatra

Jones first worked with Frank Sinatra in 1958 when invited by Princess Grace to arrange a benefit concert at the Monaco Sporting Club. Six years later, Sinatra hired him to arrange and conduct Sinatra’s second album with Count Basie, It Might as Well Be Swing (1964). Jones conducted and arranged the singer’s live album with the Basie Band, Sinatra at the Sands (1966). Jones was also the arranger/conductor when Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dean Martin, and Johnny Carson performed with the Basie orchestra in June 1965 in St. Louis, Missouri, in a benefit for Dismas House. The fund-raiser was broadcast to movie theaters around the country and eventually released on DVD. Later that year, Jones was the arranger/conductor when Sinatra and Basie appeared on The Hollywood Palace TV show on October 16, 1965.[30] Nineteen years later, Sinatra and Jones teamed up for 1984’s L.A. Is My Lady. Quincy was quoted saying,

“Frank Sinatra took me to a whole new planet. I worked with him until he passed away in ’98. He left me his ring. I never take it off. Now, when I go to Sicily, I don’t need a passport. I just flash my ring.”

Personal life

With the help of the author Alex Haley in 1972 and Mormon researchers in Salt Lake City, Jones discovered that his mother’s ancestors included James Lanier, a relative of Sidney Lanier, the poet. Jones said in an interview, “He had a baby with my great-grandmother a slave, and my grandmother was born there [on a plantation in Kentucky. We traced this all the way back to the Laniers, same family as Tennessee Williams.” Learning that the Lanier immigrant ancestors were French Huguenot refugees, who had court musicians among their ancestors, Jones attributed some of his musicianship to them. In a 2009 BBC interview, Jones said Haley also helped him learn that his father was of part Welsh ancestry.

In 1974, he suffered a life-threatening brain aneurysm, so he decided to cut back on his schedule to spend time with his friends and family. Since his family and friends believed that his life was coming to an end, they started to plan a memorial service for him. He attended his own service with his neurologist by his side in case the excitement overwhelmed him. Some of the entertainers at his service were Richard Pryor, Marvin Gaye, Sarah Vaughan and Sidney Poitier.

Jones has been married three times and has had other relationships; he has a total of seven children:

Jeri Caldwell (1957 to 1966); they had a daughter, Jolie Jones (now married and using the surname Levine).
Ulla Andersson, Swedish actress, (1967 to 1974); they had two children, Martina and Quincy Jones III;
Peggy Lipton, actress, (1974 to 1990); they had two daughters, Kidada and Rashida Jones, both born in the United States, who have become actresses.
Jones had a brief affair with Carol Reynolds, and they had a daughter, Rachel Jones
Jones dated and lived with the actress, Nastassja Kinski, from 1991 until 1995. They had a daughter, Kenya Julia Miambi Sarah Jones, born in 1993.

For the 2006 PBS television program, African American Lives, Jones had his DNA tested and genealogists researched his family history again. His DNA admixture revealed he is predominately African with 34% European in ancestry, found on both sides of his family. Research showed that he has Welsh, English, French and Italian ancestry, with European ancestry in his direct patrilineal line (Y DNA). Through his direct matrilineal line (mt DNA), he is of West African/Central African ancestry of Tikar descent, a people centered in present-day Cameroon. Other matrilineal ancestry includes European, such as Lanier male ancestors who fought for the Confederacy, making him eligible for Sons of Confederate Veterans. Among his ancestors is Betty Washington Lewis, the sister of president George Washington. Jones is also a direct descendant of Edward I of England; Edward’s ancestors included Rurik, Polish, Swiss, and French nobility.

Jones has never learned to drive, citing an accident in which he was a passenger (at age 14) as the reason.