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LUCKY MILLINDER

Lucky-Millinder
BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS

Full Name: Lucas Vanable MillInder

Description: Band leader, USA

Known For: He was MC at “The Chicago Speak Easy”

Music Styles: Jazz

Location: AL, United States of America

Date Born: 8th August 1900
Location Born: Anniston, Alabama, United States of America

Date Died: 28th September 1966
Location Died: New York City, New York, United States of America
Cause Of Death: Liver Problems

CONTACT DETAILS
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BIOGRAPHICAL PROFILE

Lucky Millinder

An American rhythm and blues and swing bandleader.

Lucius Venable “Lucky” Millinder (August 8, 1910 – September 28, 1966 was an American rhythm and blues and swing bandleader. Although he could not read or write music, did not play an instrument and rarely sang, his showmanship and musical taste made his bands successful. His group was said to have been the greatest big band to play rhythm and blues, and gave a break to a number of influential musicians at the dawn of the rock and roll era. He is a 1986 inductee of the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame

Although he could not read or write music, did not play an instrument and rarely sang, his showmanship and musical taste made his bands successful. His group was said to have been “the greatest big band to play rhythm and blues”.

In the 1920s he worked in clubs, ballrooms, and theatres in Chicago as a master of ceremonies and dancer. He first fronted a band in 1931 for an RKO theater tour, and in 1932 took over leadership of Doc Crawford’s orchestra in Harlem, New York City, as well as freelancing elsewhere.

In 1933, he took a band to Europe, playing residencies in Monte Carlo and Paris. He returned to New York to take over leadership of the Mills Blue Rhythm Band, which included Henry “Red” Allen, Charlie Shavers, Harry “Sweets” Edison and J.C. Higginbotham, and which had a regular slot at The Cotton Club.

A frontman, and an occasional singer who conducted several big bands. Millinder grew up in Chicago, worked as a dancer, and became a bandleader in 1931.

Band Leader, never played an instrument, and never sang, but discovered many top names in his time.

He was MC at “The Chicago Speak Easy” also the leader of “The Miss Blue Rhythm Band” etc.

He formed his own orchestra in 1940 and worked at the Savoy Ballroom. Some of his sidemen included Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Bill Doggett, in 1942, and also Dizzy Gillespie.

He retired in 1955, although his final recordings were around 1960.

He died from a liver ailment in New York City in 1966.

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